Delia Smith Hungarian Goulash Recipe

From my little kitchen in London, guided by the wisdom of Delia Smith’s cookbook, I discovered a dish that would forever hold a place in my heart (and my family’s, too). Hungarian Goulash, as I came to know it, is more than just a recipe; it’s a memory of warmth, flavor, and the joy of cooking something that feels like a hug in a bowl. This dish, with its rich, paprika-infused sauce and tender chunks of beef, became a testament to the power of good food to bring people together.

Why You’ll Be Glad You Tried Delia Smith Hungarian Goulash

Trying this Hungarian Goulash recipe is a decision you won’t regret, and here’s why: It’s a dive into a world of comforting flavors and rich, paprika-infused goodness that’s both satisfying and nourishing. This recipe simplifies traditional methods without compromising on the authentic taste that makes Hungarian Goulash a beloved dish worldwide. It’s perfect for any level of cooking expertise, offering a straightforward process that guarantees a delicious outcome. Whether you’re looking for a cozy meal on a chilly evening or a hearty dish to share with friends and family, this goulash will hit the spot, promising warmth, comfort, and a delightful culinary experience.

How To Make Delia Smith’s Hungarian Goulash Recipe Overview

This rendition of Hungarian Goulash takes about 2 hours to prepare and cook, promising a delightful culinary journey with a reward that’s absolutely worth the wait. It’s a straightforward recipe, making it a perfect choice for a hearty family dinner or a cozy gathering with friends. This recipe serves 6 to 8 people, and the beauty of it lies in its versatility – it pairs wonderfully with crusty bread to mop up the sauce or a side of fluffy rice. And don’t worry if your guests run late; this goulash only gets better with time.

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg chuck beef, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1.5 tablespoons plain flour
  • 3 large onions, roughly chopped
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 800g fresh tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons Hungarian paprika (smoked paprika adds a lovely depth)
  • 200ml sour cream
  • 1 large green or red pepper, deseeded and cut into strips
  • Salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions:

  1. Browning the Beef: Warm up half of your olive oil in a sizable pot over a medium-high flame. Toss in the beef cubes in small batches, searing them until they’re nicely browned all around. Take them out and keep them aside.
  2. Vegetable Magic: Using the same pot, dial the heat down to medium and pour in the rest of the olive oil. Throw in your chopped onions and garlic, cooking until they’re soft and have a golden hue.
  3. Mixing in the Flavors: Now, sprinkle the flour and smoked paprika over your softened onions, giving everything a good stir to mix well. Add the beef back into the mix, along with the chopped tomatoes. Season this with a pinch of salt and a grind of black pepper to taste.
  4. Slow Cook to Perfection: Bring your pot to a simmer, then lower the heat to keep things gently bubbling. Cover the pot and let it do its magic for about an hour and a half, until the beef is tender and the sauce thick.
  5. Final Touches: About 30 minutes before you’re ready to serve, add the pepper strips to the pot. This is also the time to adjust your seasonings if needed. Right before serving, blend in the sour cream for that creamy finish.
  6. Serving: Serve your beautifully prepared goulash steaming hot, ideal with a side of crusty bread or fluffy rice.

Nutritional Value:

Each serving approximately contains:

Calories: 450 kcal

Protein: 35 g

Carbohydrates: 15 g

Fat: 29 g

Saturated Fat: 11 g

Cholesterol: 120 mg

Sodium: 300 mg

Fiber: 4 g

Sugar: 7 g

Note: Nutritional values are approximate and may vary based on specific ingredients used.

Also Read: Delia Smith Chicken Tagine Recipe

FAQs:

What’s the difference between goulash and Hungarian goulash?

Goulash and Hungarian goulash are often thought to be the same, but there’s a key difference. Traditional Hungarian goulash is more like a soup, made with beef, vegetables, and lots of paprika. It’s a staple in Hungary. Goulash in other places can be thicker, more like a stew, and might include different meats and less paprika. So, the main difference is in the consistency and the spice level.

Why is goulash so popular in Hungary?

Goulash is incredibly popular in Hungary for several reasons. First, it’s deeply rooted in Hungarian history and tradition, reflecting the country’s culinary heritage. The dish originated with herdsmen, known as “gulyás,” who cooked the stew in kettles over open fires. Its main ingredient, paprika, a staple spice in Hungarian cuisine, gives goulash its distinctive flavor and warmth. This hearty, comforting dish is versatile and can be made to suit different tastes, making it a beloved meal across generations. Additionally, goulash embodies the essence of Hungarian hospitality and community, often shared with family and friends, further cementing its place in the heart of Hungarian culture.

Who invented Hungarian goulash?

Hungarian goulash doesn’t have a single inventor. It evolved from the meals of Hungarian shepherds, or “gulyás,” centuries ago. These herdsmen would cook diced meat with onions in a pot over open fire, adding paprika for flavor. Over time, this simple stew became what we know as goulash today. It reflects Hungary’s pastoral history and has become a national dish, loved by many for its warmth and heartiness.

Is it possible to substitute the fresh tomatoes with canned ones?

Yes, it’s totally fine to use canned tomatoes instead of fresh ones in recipes like goulash. In fact, canned tomatoes can be a great alternative, especially when fresh ones aren’t in season or if you’re looking for convenience. They’re already chopped and ready to go, saving you some time. Just remember to adjust the liquid in your recipe if needed, as canned tomatoes can be juicier.

Can I make Hungarian Goulash in a slow cooker?

Yes, you can definitely make Hungarian Goulash in a slow cooker. It’s actually a great way to cook it. First, brown the meat and sauté the onions. Then, put everything into the slow cooker. Add your spices and liquids. Set it to cook slowly. This way, the meat becomes really tender, and the flavors mix well together. Cooking it slow and low lets all the ingredients meld perfectly, making a delicious goulash.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Hungarian Goulash is a versatile and comforting dish that has captured hearts far beyond its origins in Hungary. Whether made traditionally over an open fire, adapted for the slow cooker, or tweaked with canned tomatoes, its essence remains the same. It’s a testament to the power of simple, hearty ingredients coming together to create something deeply satisfying. This dish not only feeds the body but also warms the soul, making it a cherished recipe in kitchens around the world.

Delia Smith Hungarian Goulash Recipe

Delia Smith Hungarian Goulash Recipe

Total Time 2 hours
Cuisine Hungarian
Servings 8 people
Calories 450 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 kg chuck beef cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1.5 tablespoons plain flour
  • 3 large onions roughly chopped
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cloves of garlic crushed
  • 800 g fresh tomatoes roughly chopped
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons Hungarian paprika smoked paprika adds a lovely depth
  • 200 ml sour cream
  • 1 large green or red pepper deseeded and cut into strips
  • Salt to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Instructions
 

  • Browning the Beef: Warm up half of your olive oil in a sizable pot over a medium-high flame. Toss in the beef cubes in small batches, searing them until they’re nicely browned all around. Take them out and keep them aside.
  • Vegetable Magic: Using the same pot, dial the heat down to medium and pour in the rest of the olive oil. Throw in your chopped onions and garlic, cooking until they’re soft and have a golden hue.
  • Mixing in the Flavors: Now, sprinkle the flour and smoked paprika over your softened onions, giving everything a good stir to mix well. Add the beef back into the mix, along with the chopped tomatoes. Season this with a pinch of salt and a grind of black pepper to taste.
  • Slow Cook to Perfection: Bring your pot to a simmer, then lower the heat to keep things gently bubbling. Cover the pot and let it do its magic for about an hour and a half, until the beef is tender and the sauce thick.
  • Final Touches: About 30 minutes before you’re ready to serve, add the pepper strips to the pot. This is also the time to adjust your seasonings if needed. Right before serving, blend in the sour cream for that creamy finish.
  • Serving: Serve your beautifully prepared goulash steaming hot, ideal with a side of crusty bread or fluffy rice.

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