Mary Berry Victoria Sponge Cake Recipe

The Victoria sponge cake, often associated with Mary Berry, is a quintessential part of British tea-time tradition. This delightfully simple yet elegant cake is named after Queen Victoria, who was known to enjoy a slice with her afternoon tea. Victoria Sponge Cake Mary Berry’s version is celebrated for its light, airy texture and its straightforward, foolproof recipe. It’s the perfect treat for beginners and experienced bakers alike.

How To Make Mary Berry’s Victoria Sponge Cake Recipe Overview

This recipe will guide you through the process of making a larger Victoria sponge cake that serves approximately 12 people. The total cooking time is about 35 minutes, with an additional 15 minutes required for preparation. The cake itself is composed of two fluffy layers of sponge, sandwiched with a generous spread of jam and, optionally, whipped cream. It’s a fantastic choice for any gathering, from casual afternoon teas to more festive occasions.

Ingredients

  • 5 free-range eggs
  • 280g (10oz) butter, softened, plus extra for greasing the tins
  • 280g (10oz) self-raising flour
  • 280g (10oz) caster sugar, plus extra for dusting
  • 2.5 tsp baking powder
  • Whipped double cream (optional), for serving
  • Good-quality strawberry or raspberry jam, for serving

Instructions

  1. Begin by heating your oven to 190°C (375°F) or Gas Mark 5. Prepare two 20cm (8-inch) round baking tins by lightly buttering them and lining the bottoms with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, mix the butter and sugar vigorously until the combination becomes light and airy. This process is crucial as it helps to incorporate air, giving the sponge its signature light texture.
  3. Add the eggs one at a time into the mixture, fully blending each before adding the next. Should the mixture begin to separate, mix in a small spoonful of flour with each egg to stabilize it.
  4. Gently sift the flour and baking powder together over the mixture, folding them in with a spatula just until the batter is even. It’s important to mix this gently to avoid deflating the batter.
  5. Pour the batter into the prepared tins, leveling the surface with a spatula. Lightly tap the tins on your work surface to release any trapped air bubbles.
  6. Place in the oven and bake for about 20-25 minutes, or until the cakes have turned a golden color and a skewer comes out clean from the center. Let the cakes cool for 5 minutes in their tins before removing them to a wire rack to cool off entirely.
  7. To assemble, spread your choice of jam on one cake layer. Optionally, you can add a layer of whipped cream over the jam. Place the second layer on top and give it a light dusting of caster sugar to finish.

Nutritional Value (per serving)

Calories: Approximately 350

Fat: 18g

Carbohydrates: 42g

Protein: 5g

Sugar: 25g

Also Try: Mary Berry Sponge Fruit Flan Recipe

Substitute

Eggs:

To replace one egg, you can use ¼ cup of unsweetened applesauce, or ¼ cup of mashed banana, though these may slightly alter the flavor.

Caster Sugar:

Granulated sugar can be used as a direct substitute. For a finer texture, you can pulse granulated sugar in a food processor.

Self-Raising Flour:

To make your own self-raising flour, add 1 ½ teaspoons of baking powder and ¼ teaspoon of salt to each cup of all-purpose flour.

Butter:

For a dairy-free option, you can use an equal amount of margarine or a plant-based butter alternative.

Strawberry or Raspberry Jam:

You can use any type of fruit jam or preserves you prefer, or even fresh fruit compote if you like a less sweet, more natural fruit flavor.

Whipped Double Cream:

A good substitute is whipped coconut cream for a dairy-free version, or you can use full-fat Greek yogurt for a thicker, tangier filling.

FAQs

What is the secret of a good Victoria sponge?

The secret to a great Victoria sponge lies in the creaming process. Thoroughly creaming the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy is crucial. This step adds air to the batter, helping the cake rise and ensuring a light texture. Also, using fresh, quality ingredients, especially the eggs and butter, makes a significant difference. Finally, avoid overmixing once you add the flour to keep the sponge soft.

What to avoid when making sponge cake?

When making sponge cake, avoid overmixing the batter after adding flour; it can make the cake tough. Don’t open the oven door too early; it causes the cake to fall. Ensure all ingredients are at room temperature for better mixing. Finally, measure ingredients accurately to maintain the correct balance for a perfect rise and texture.

Can I make this cake with different fillings?

Absolutely! Although strawberry or raspberry jam is traditional, feel free to experiment with other fillings like lemon curd, blueberry preserves, or even a layer of fresh berries and cream. Different fillings can add a unique twist and make each cake a new experience.

How can I ensure my sponge is light and airy?

To achieve a light and airy sponge, focus on creaming the butter and sugar very well until the mixture is pale and fluffy. This process adds air, which is crucial for a light sponge. Also, be gentle when folding in the flour and do not overmix, as this can deflate the air and make the sponge dense.

What’s the best way to store Victoria sponge cake?

If your cake doesn’t have cream, you can store it at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 2 days. If it includes whipped cream, store it in the refrigerator and consume within a day or two to enjoy its best quality and texture.

Conclusion

Mary Berry’s Victoria sponge cake is a timeless classic that never fails to impress. Whether you’re hosting a lavish tea party or just craving a sweet treat, this cake promises perfection with every bite. Its simplicity, paired with the rich flavors of butter, jam, and cream, creates a truly delightful dessert. Happy baking!

Mary Berry Victoria Sponge Cake Recipe

Mary Berry Victoria Sponge Cake Recipe

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Course Cakes
Cuisine British
Servings 12 people
Calories 350 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 5 free-range eggs
  • 280 g 10oz butter, softened, plus extra for greasing the tins
  • 280 g 10oz self-raising flour
  • 280 g 10oz caster sugar, plus extra for dusting
  • 2.5 tsp baking powder
  • Whipped double cream optional, for serving
  • Good-quality strawberry or raspberry jam for serving

Instructions
 

  • Begin by heating your oven to 190°C (375°F) or Gas Mark 5. Prepare two 20cm (8-inch) round baking tins by lightly buttering them and lining the bottoms with parchment paper.
  • In a large bowl, mix the butter and sugar vigorously until the combination becomes light and airy. This process is crucial as it helps to incorporate air, giving the sponge its signature light texture.
  • Add the eggs one at a time into the mixture, fully blending each before adding the next. Should the mixture begin to separate, mix in a small spoonful of flour with each egg to stabilize it.
  • Gently sift the flour and baking powder together over the mixture, folding them in with a spatula just until the batter is even. It’s important to mix this gently to avoid deflating the batter.
  • Pour the batter into the prepared tins, leveling the surface with a spatula. Lightly tap the tins on your work surface to release any trapped air bubbles.
  • Place in the oven and bake for about 20-25 minutes, or until the cakes have turned a golden color and a skewer comes out clean from the center. Let the cakes cool for 5 minutes in their tins before removing them to a wire rack to cool off entirely.
  • To assemble, spread your choice of jam on one cake layer. Optionally, you can add a layer of whipped cream over the jam. Place the second layer on top and give it a light dusting of caster sugar to finish.

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